Arizona Archaeological Society

 

 
 


2018-2019 Meeting Schedule 

The chapter meets at Pueblo Grande Museum at 7:00 pm on the second Tuesday of each month (except during June, July & August). Driving directions to PGM: Due to the construction of the light-rail system, west-bound cars can no longer turn left from Washington Street into the museum; instead traffic approaching from the east must make a U-turn at the light at 44th street. From the West Valley, use 44th Street or east-bound Washington Street.

Date Speaker Topic
Sept.11 Butch Farabee, NPS
El Camino del Diablo, The Devil's Highway
Oct. 09 Michael E. Smith, ASU
Teotihuacan: A World City in Ancient Mexico
Nov. 13 Paul Creasman, UA Ancient Egypt's 25th Dynasty and The Pyramid Field/Royal Cemetery at Nuri,  Sudan.
Dec. 11 TBD

To join the Phoenix Chapter, Click on the link below:  

Phoenix Chapter Membership Form

To download the October flyer, click on the link below:

Oct 2018 Flyer.pdf

October 2018 Phoenix Chapter News


The Street of the Dead, looking south from the Pyramid of the Moon, with the Pyramid of the Sun on the left.

October 9th Meeting: Michael E. Smith, Ph.D., ASU, presents Teotihuacan: A World City in Ancient Mexico. "World city” indicates a city in touch with the world, operating on a world level; for ancient Mexico, the “world” was Mesoamerica. This talk will explore the art and archaeology of this ancient “world city” and will focus on recent archaeological research that is transforming our views of the city. This talk is intended to provide background for the current exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum, Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire, a major traveling exhibition which will be on display in the Steele Gallery from Oct. 6 to Jan. 27, 2019.

Teotihuacan stood out in Classic-period Mesoamerica for its size, complexity, and influence in distant areas; Teotihuacan traded and interacted with all corners of Mesoamerica, and the city held great prestige for the distant Maya kings. Teotihuacan was the first, largest, and most influential metropolis on the American continent. In its heyday between 100 BCE and 650 CE, the city encompassed an area of 15 square kilometers with a population of around 140,000. Who inhabited Teotihuacan, its original name, and why it was abandoned are still unknowns. When the Aztecs came into the Valley of Mexico from the north in the first half of the 14th century, they discovered its ruins, named it Teotihuacan, the place where the gods were born, and used it as the setting for their own creation myth.

Michael E. Smith, Ph.D., has been a Professor in the ASU School of Human Evolution & Social Change since 2005 and became Director of the ASU Teotihuacan Research Laboratory in 2015. He has directed numerous fieldwork projects at Aztec sites in central Mexico, pioneering the excavation of houses and the study of daily life. He has published six books and numerous scholarly articles on the Aztecs, including The Aztecs (3rd ed., 2012), Aztec City-State Capitals (2008), At Home with the Aztecs (2016), and Rethinking the Aztec Economy (co-edited by Nichols, Berdan & Smith, 2017).

Upcoming Field Trip: Eric Feldman is setting up a group tour to see the Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum sometime between Oct. 6, 2018 and Jan. 27, 2019.

September 11th Meeting: Retired National Park Service Superintendent Charles R. “Butch” Farabee presented El Camino del Diablo, The Devil's Highway (also called The Road of the Dead). Having driven this remote, four-wheel drive road six times, he presented a good overall view of this fascinating but humbling area and the life-sustaining granite rock tank pools, called tinajas, hidden at the base of nondescript mountains along the trail. The most important of these life-sustaining pools was the Tinajas Altas, where hundreds of bedrock mortars, as well as numerous petroglyphs, pictographs and related evidence testify to the use of this area, probably from even long before Father Kino, De Anza and then, Spanish miners, passed nearby. Hundreds of graves were once scattered along El Camino but are now mostly gone, obliterated by time, wind, sand, and often, man. In Arizona, The Devil’s Highway is now used mainly by the U.S. Border Patrol. It traverses Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, and the Barry M. Goldwater Bombing Range, with little sections of land owned by the State of Arizona and the U. S. Bureau of Land Management, thrown in.

Fall Meeting Schedule:

Nov. 13  Paul Creasman, PhD, UA, Ancient Egypt's 25th Dynasty and The Pyramid Field/Royal Cemetery at Nuri,  Sudan.

Dec. 11   Holiday Potluck and 2019 Elections. Speaker TBD.

Upcoming Events:

Oct. 3:     6:30 pm, PGM, Phoenix, Talk: City of Phoenix Archaeology: Why we do what we do, by. Laurene Montero, Phoenix City Archaeologist.

Oct. 19:   2018 Annual Arizona Archaeological Council Fall Conference, Arizona History Museum, Tucson

Oct. 20:   AAS Fall State Meeting, Mazatzal Hotel & Casino, Payson, Az

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

**For chapter news from earlier this year, go to the bottom of this page.

Phoenix Chapter Officers

Office Office Holder Telephone Email Address
President Ellie Large 480-461-0563 elarge@cox.net
Executive VP/Cert Rep Marie Britton 480-827-8070 mbrit@cox.net
Treasurer Bob Unferth 602-371-1165                 bobunf@cox.net 2007 E. Northview Ave., Phoenix, Az 85020-5660
Secretary/Education Ellen Martin 480-820-1474 e13martin@hotmail.com
1-Year Director Phyllis Smith 623-694-8245 76desert@gmail.com 
2-Year Director Nancy Unferth 602-371-1165 nferth@aol.com
3-Year Director Vicki Caltabiano 480-730-3289 vickierhart@cox.net 
Advisor Laurene Montero 602-495-0901 laurene.montero@phoenix.gov 

                                                                                    


Chapter Projects

PGM STABILIZATION PROJECT- PHOENIX CHAPTER

Pueblo Grande is a Classic Period Hohokam site located in downtown Phoenix at Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park. This archaeological site has been designated a National Historic Landmark. For the past thirteen years the Arizona Archaeology Society, Phoenix Chapter volunteers along with the Southwest Archaeology Team have participated in doing stabilization, reconstruction, and general maintenance on the platform mound and adjacent room structures.

After the Hohokam abandoned this site, it fell into a state of self-stabilization where walls become protected by the material that eroded from above. Early excavations, especially in the 1930's, exposed many of these walls again. These adobe walls have been subjected to constant erosion from wind and rain as well as other agents of deterioration. Consequently, new adobe mud must be applied periodically to keep these structures from melting away. Stone faced walls require repointing to keep the stones from falling from the wall. Exposed room walls are protected by applying a thin layer of mud to the wall surface. Monitoring these architectural features for erosion damage is an on-going task.

A dedicated group of volunteers, known as the PGM Mudslingers meet one Saturday a month except in July and August. The Mudslingers work is coordinated by Jim Britton (member of AAS and SWAT) under the direction of Dr.Todd Bostwick (Phoenix City Archaeologist). All work is documented by detailed field notes and photos.

This partnership between the Mudslingers and the City Archaeologist is a great benefit to Pueblo Grande Museum and is very much appreciated by the Museum Director and the Parks and Recreation Department staff.

by Jim Britton

Project Activity Project Director
Mudslingers at Pueblo Grande 3rd Saturday of each month Contact Jim Britton to verify the time and day
    







Local Museums

Museum Location Website
Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park 4619 E. Washington Street, Phoenix AZ 85034
(602) 495-0901
Pueblo Grande Museum

Huhugam Heritage Center

 21359 S Maricopa Rd, Chandler, AZ 85226 grichhc.org
Huhugam Ki Museum
10005 E. Osborn Road, Scottsdale, Arizona 85256
(480) 850-8190
Huhugam Ki Museum
Arizona Museum of Natural History 53 N. Macdonald St.
Mesa, AZ 85201
(480) 664-2230
Arizona Museum of Natural History
Cave Creek Museum 6140 East Skyline Drive
Cave Creek, AZ 85331
(480) 488-2764
Cave Creek Museum



















September 2018 Phoenix Chapter News

Retired National Park Service Superintendent Charles R. “Butch” Farabee presents El Camino del Diablo, The Devil's Highway. Also called The Road of the Dead, The Devil's Highway is a brutal, 200-mile long, prehistoric and historic route from northern Sonora to Yuma and then on to the mission areas of California. Used for at least a millennium by Native Americans, conquistadores, Father Kino, miners, undocumented aliens, and modern-day adventurers, the highway crosses three large federal areas in the extreme desert of southern Arizona. Approx. 400 to 2,000 lives have been lost traveling along our very own, isolated and wild part of the Arizona-Mexico border, most from heat, exposure, and a desperate lack of water. Join Butch Farabee, who has driven this remote, four-wheel drive road six times, for a part history, part travelogue, and part informational overview of this fascinating but humbling area.

Early travelers on El Camino - on foot, horseback and wagon until the first automobile in 1915 - often began in Caborca, Sonora, 40 miles south of the border. Leaving this then frontier village and its permanent little river, they encountered only one more certain source of water between there and the Colorado River. If lucky, they could find water further on, standing in a handful of granite rock tanks, hidden at the base of nondescript mountains along the next 125 miles. The most important of these life-sustaining pools was the Tinajas Altas. Hundreds of bedrock mortars, as well as numerous petroglyphs, pictographs and related evidence, testify to the use of this area, probably even long before Father Kino, De Anza and then, Spanish miners, passed nearby. Graves, possibly numbering in the hundreds, were once scattered along El Camino but are now mostly gone, obliterated by time, wind, sand, and often, man. In Arizona, The Devil’s Highway, now used mainly by the U.S. Border Patrol, traverses Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, and the Barry M. Goldwater Bombing Range, with little sections of land owned by the State of Arizona and the U. S. Bureau of Land Management, thrown in.

Charles R. “Butch” Farabee grew up in Tucson, was very active in Scouting and the out-of-doors; he graduated from Tucson High School in 1960 and then the University of Arizona. He has a Bachelor of Science in Zoology and a Master of Arts in Public Administration and is a graduate of the FBI Academy. He spent 35 years with the National Park Service as a field ranger and then superintendent in 10 different park areas including Sequoia, Grand Canyon, Glen Canyon, Lake Mead, Death Valley, Yosemite, Glacier and Washington, DC. He has had four books published but is mostly just the very proud father of two sons and their families. He has driven this remote, four-wheel drive road six times, and will give us a part-history, part-travelogue, and part-informational overview of this fascinating but humbling area.

Fall Meeting Schedule:

Oct. 9:      Michael E. Smith, Ph.D., ASU, Teotihuacan: A World City in Ancient Mexico. "World city” indicates a city in touch with the world, operating on a world level; for ancient Mexico, the “world” was Mesoamerica. The exhibit Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire is coming to the Phoenix Art Museum, Oct. 6, 2018 - Jan. 27, 2019. We are setting up a group tour.

Nov. 13:  Paul Creasman, PhD, UA, Ancient Egypt's 25th Dynasty and The Pyramid Field/Royal Cemetery at Nuri,  Sudan.

Dec. 11:   Holiday Potluck and 2019 Elections. Speaker TBD.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large


May 2018 Phoenix Chapter News

May Meeting: Our May 8th chapter meeting features Don Liponi, Photographer and Author, who will discuss the book La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border, a survey of Kumeyaay and related artwork in Southern California, Colorado River Corridor, Western Arizona and Baja California. The Kumeyaay are thought to be descendants of the Patayan tradition. This is the first publication to focus on the indigenous rock art of this region and is a testament to the historical permanence of Kumeyaay culture. A team of over 15 major contributors, one-third of whom are Native Americans, and prominent regional professional archaeologists and avid avocationalists worked together over a 5-year period to discover or rediscover more than 100 new rock art sites that have never been published. Don will be selling signed copies of his book after the talk. The book contains over 150 color photos and interviews with Tipai Native Americans and contributions by regional Native Americans and leading archaeologists like Ken Hedges, Steve Shackley, Polly Schaafsma, Lynn H. Gamble, Michael Wilken-Robertson and Ben Swadley. The book is on sale for $20; all money from sales goes towards the design and production of the second volume for which they are busy compiling yet more sites.


May 6th Visit to the Arizona Science Center: The Pompei Exhibition closes May 28th. Several of us are planning to view the exhibit on May 6th, the first Sunday of  May, when general admission is free for seniors over 62. There will still be a $12 fee to visit the Pompeii exhibit. There is also a special Supervolcanoes Planetarium Show on that date. Contact me at elarge@cox.net if you would like to join us.

April Meeting: We had a large turnout for our April 10th speaker, Ethan Ortega, Instructional Coordinator and Supervisory Archaeologist for the Northern Region of New Mexico Historic Sites (Coronado, Jemez, and Los Luceros). He presented his Pecos Conference prize-winning talk on False Truths, Restored Ruins, and New Artifacts: Looking Beyond the Oxymoronic Past of the Coronado Historic Site through Field Work. For the first time in over 100 years of archaeological research, the entire property of the Coronado Historic Site, including Kuaua Pueblo, has been extensively surveyed. In a joint effort with New Mexico Historic Sites, the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies, and the Friends of Coronado Historic Site, several new sites were identified. With the help of 75 volunteers over 7 weeks, dozens of test units were excavated showing that Kuaua Pueblo was larger than once thought and may have had an extensive turkey industry. There is more work to be done and volunteers are welcome. Contact ethan.ortega@state.nm.us for more information.

April Book Sale: We had numerous books, journals, magazines and out-of-print Archaeology Expo posters for sale at the April meeting. We did well and I've found some more Archaeology Expo posters to bring to the next sale.

April 22nd Field Trip to Tumamoc HillFourteen of us enjoyed the drive up Tumamoc Hill on a warm and beautiful Sunday morning to tour the site with our hosts, Paul and Suzanne Fish. (Since it is located just west of central Tucson and Sunday was Earth Day, we had competition from many hikers for the paved road leading to the top). This trincheras site was once thought to have only surficial sleeping circles dating to late Hohokam phases; the circles turned out to be the last remnants pithouse walls that predated the Hohokam. Reading the history of research on the remains on Tumamoc Hill is a fascinating adventure which clearly illustrates the necessity for controlled excavations. If anyone is interested in reading about the history of this site, contact me and I can email you a bibliography and pdfs of several articles.

Upcoming Events:

May 1, 5:30 pm, Archaeology Cafe: Archaeologists Glen Rice and Jeffery Clark will have a discussion and debate about The Salado in Phoenix: Point/Counterpoint. At Changing Hands Bookstore, Central & 3rd Ave.

May 2, 6:30 pm, PGMA Presentation: San Carlos Apache Fiddler by Anthony Belvado.

May 3, 7 pm, SWAT meeting, Az Museum of Natural History, Mesa. Justin Parks will speak about The Role of the Bow and Arrow in the Prehistoric Southwest.

May 5, 1-2 pm, Heard Museum, Talk: Set in Stone but Not in Meaning: Southwestern Indian Rock Art by archaeologist Allen Dart. Free.

May 18, All day, PGM, International Museum Day. For free tickets, go to pueblogrande.com; otherwise regular museum admission applies.

June 2, 9 am-Noon, PGM, World Atlatl Day. The local primitive skills group SALT (Study of Ancient Lifeways and Technologies) will conduct an atlatl demonstration, distance, and accuracy contest, open to the public.

June 6, 6:30 pm, PGM, Talk on Protecting a Way of Life by Akimel O’odham artist and educator Royce Manuel.

June 6-8, 2018 Arizona Historic Preservation Conference, Valley Ho Resort, Scottsdale, azpreservation.com.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

NOTE: Our May meeting is the last until meetings resume in the fall on September 11.

--Ellie Large

April 2018 Phoenix Chapter News

April Meeting: The speaker for our April 10th meeting will be Ethan Ortega, Instructional Coordinator and Supervisory Archaeologist for the Northern Region of New Mexico Historic Sites (Coronado, Jemez, and Los Luceros), who will present his Pecos Conference prize-winning talk onFalse Truths, Restored Ruins, and New Artifacts: Looking Beyond the Oxymoronic Past of the Coronado Historic Site through Field Work. After proclaiming itself the authority on Middle Rio Grande Pueblo culture and first European contact, the “facts” printed on monument panels are being rewritten. For the first time in over 100 years of archaeological research, the entire property of the Coronado Historic Site, including Kuaua Pueblo, has been extensively surveyed. In a joint effort with New Mexico Historic Sites, the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies, and the Friends of Coronado Historic Site, several new sites have been identified. With the help of 75 volunteers over 7 weeks, dozens of test units were excavated showing that Kuaua Pueblo was larger than once thought and may have had an extensive turkey industry. This project has also revealed the best way to connect people to the past is to let them literally dig into it.

Ethan has a B.S. in Anthropology from Eastern New Mexico University and is currently working on his M.S. in Museum Studies at the University of New Mexico. His experience includes archaeological excavations and surveys in Spain and throughout the American Southwest. Ethan’s goal is to bridge the gap between the public and archaeology to increase understanding and stewardship of archaeological resources. Recent awards include the Edgar Lee Hewett Award for Service to the People of New Mexico (2017), the Bice Award for Archaeological Excellence (2017), and the Pecos Conference Cordell/Powers Prize for Young Archaeologists (2017).

March Meeting: The speaker for our March 13th meeting was Todd Bostwick, Ph.D., who gave us a quick tour of 15,000 Years of Archaeology on Sicily: Cultural Crossroads of the Mediterranean. Sicily boasts some of the best preserved examples of Greek architecture in the world, including temples and a theater - even better than in Greece itself - as well as Roman ruins which include the famous villa of Piazza Armerina, where hundreds of remarkable mosaic floors were preserved. The rich archaeological heritage of Sicily dates back to the Upper Pleistocene, when Sicily was connected to the mainland; numerous caves contain Upper Paleolithic cave art including the Grotta San Teodoro in Messina. There are also numerous museums; three of the best are the excellent regional museums at Palermo, Syracuse and Agrigento.

April Book Sale: Each year we conduct several fund-raising events to benefit the Pueblo Grande Museum. We will have a book sale at our April 10th meeting to help members dispose of the numerous books, journals and magazines they have acquired through the years or to pick up the volumes missing from their collection. So bring all your unwanted bounty of books to the April meeting!

April 22nd Field trip to Tumamoc Hill. The trip costs $300 and is limited to 20 people, so the cost would be $15 a person if we have 20 people. We have to pay in advance so checks should be made out to the chapter and given or sent to Phyllis prior to April 22. AAS members only. Details will be forthcoming. To sign up send Phyllis an email at 76desert@gmail.com.

Upcoming Events:

May 1, 5:30 pm, Archaeology Cafe: Archaeologists Glen Rice and Jeffery Clark will join us for lively discussion and debate about The Salado in Phoenix: Point/Counterpoint. At Changing Hands Bookstore, Central & 3rd Ave., Phoenix.

May 3, 7 pm, Quarterly SWAT meeting, Arizona Museum of Natural History Theater, Mesa.

June 6-8, 2018 Arizona Historic Preservation Conference, Valley Ho Resort, Scottsdale, azpreservation.com.

May 8th Meeting:  Don Liponi, Photographer and Author, La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border (with book signing). See www.larumorosarockart.com.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

March 2018 Phoenix Chapter News

March Meeting: The speaker for our March 13th meeting will be Todd Bostwick, Ph.D.; his topic is 15,000 Years of Archaeology on Sicily: Cultural Crossroads of the Mediterranean. The island of Sicily has a rich archaeological heritage dating back to the Upper Pleistocene, when Sicily was connected to the mainland, allowing humans and animals to migrate to the region, and numerous caves contain their cave art. Later Neolithic farmers made beautiful incised pottery and participated in extensive trade networks, including obsidian from two nearby islands. During the Bronze Age, thousands of tombs were cut into the limestone cliffs, providing insight into ancient concepts of the afterlife. Around 700 BC, substantial Phoenician and Greek colonies were established; their ruins contain some the best preserved Greek temples in existence today. Roman ruins are also well represented, including the famous villa of Piazza Armerina, where hundreds of remarkable mosaic floors were preserved, depicting the daily life of Roman royalty.

Dr. Bostwick has been conducting archaeological research in the Southwest for 37 years and was the Phoenix City Archaeologist for 21 years. He is now the Director of Archaeology at the Verde Valley Archaeology Center. He has an MA in Anthropology and a PhD in History from ASU, and taught classes at both ASU and NAU for several years. He has published numerous books and articles on Southwest archaeology and history, and his projects have received awards from the National Park Service, the Arizona Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission, and the Arizona Archaeological Society. More importantly, he visits archaeological sites around the world and always documents his travels with photographs and research so that he can provide us with an entertaining and educational experience.

February Meeting: Aaron Wright, Ph.D., presented The Western Range of the Red-on-Buff Culture, Redux. He explained the history of archaeological research on the western boundary of the Hohokam area between the prehistoric Colorado River peoples and the Hohokam who lived along the Gila and Salt Rivers. Both groups produced paddle-and-anvil buffwares, and in some time periods groups from the Colorado River lived alongside the Hohokam in the same villages, probably intermarrying. In more recent historic times the Pee-Posh (Opa or Cocomaricopa) took refuge with the Akimel O'otam (Pima) on the Gila River and are co-resident with them on the Gila River Indian Reservation and on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Reservation.

April Book Sale: Each year we conduct several fund-raising events to benefit the Pueblo Grande Museum. We will have a book sale at our April 10th meeting to help members dispose of the numerous books, journals and magazines they have acquired through the years or to pick up the volumes missing from their collection. So bring all your unwanted bounty of books to the April meeting!

Hikes & Field Trips:

April 22nd Field trip to Tumamoc Hill. The trip costs $300 and is limited to 20 people, so the cost would be $15 a person if we have 20 people. We have to pay in advance so checks should be made out to the chapter prior to April 22. AAS members only. Details will be forthcoming. To sign up send Phyllis an email at 76desert@gmail.com.

Feb. 10th Field Trip to Hummingbird Point. The trip to Hummingbird Point was led by Jolanta Sokol and Michael Clinton. Nine people went including Jolanta and Michael.

Upcoming Events:

March 1, 7 pm, SWAT Meeting, AzMNH, Mesa: Talk by Chris Caseldine on The analysis of a possible Polvoron phase pithouse on top of the Mesa Grande platform mound.

March 5-8, 5th Tri-National Symposium: Celebrating the Sonoran Desert, Ajo

March 6, 5:30 pm, Archaeology Café: The Salt River and Irrigation: 1,000 Years of Bringing the Valley to Life by geoarchaeologist Gary Huckleberry, Ph.D.

March 10, All day: Archaeology Expo at Arizona Museum of Natural History, Mesa.

Spring Meeting Schedule:

Apr. 10     Ethan Ortega, Archaeologist, Coronado Historic Site, Bernalillo, NM. False Truths, Restored Ruins, and New Artifacts: Looking Beyond the Oxymoronic Past of Coronado Historic Site through Field Work

May 8       Dan Liponi, Kumeyaay/Patayan pictographs w/book signing. See ww.larumorosarockart.com.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

February 2018 Phoenix Chapter News

February Meeting: Aaron Wright, Ph.D., will present The Western Range of the Red-on-Buff Culture, Redux. Prehistoric Southwestern Arizona is the interface between Patayan and Hohokam material culture and settlement patterns and, presumably, the ways-of-life that are tied to each of those traditions. Still, the western frontier of the Hohokam World remains little studied and is therefore poorly defined. This presentation reviews the history of research on this topic, revisiting the development and eventual demise of primary Hohokam villages along the lower Gila River. In contemporary perspective, this historical trajectory raises important questions about ethnic diversity, co-residence, and conflict.

Aaron is a Preservation Archaeologist at Archaeology Southwest, Tucson. He earned an MA in 2006 and a PhD in 2011, both from Washington State University. His research is currently focused on the Hohokam and Patayan traditions in southwestern Arizona. He is specifically interested in the cultural landscape of the lower Gila River, which is renowned for a unique mixture of Patayan and Hohokam settlements, dense galleries of world-class rock art, and numerous enigmatic geoglyphs. Aaron is the lead researcher on Archaeology Southwest’s long-term goal of establishing a Great Bend of the Gila National Monument. He is a co-editor of Leaving Mesa Verde: Peril and Change in the Thirteenth-Century Southwest (University of Arizona Press, 2010) and author of Religion on the Rocks: Hohokam Rock Art, Ritual Practice, and Social Transformation (University of Utah Press, 2014), which won the 2012 Don D. and Catherine S. Fowler Book Prize. His most recent co-authored work is the The Great Bend of the Gila: Contemporary Native American Connections to an Ancestral Landscape (Archaeology Southwest, 2016).

January Meeting: Chris Garraty, Assistant Director of Cultural Resources for Logan Simpson, gave a very interesting talk explaining how recent archaeological and historical investigations at the Hohokam site of La Plaza revealed evidence that a Sedentary period platform mound once stood in the north part of ASU’s Tempe campus near Wells Fargo Arena. He showed us a sequence of maps from the late 1800s and early 1900s that documented three Hohokam platform mounds within La Plaza. These mounds had been leveled by the early to mid-1900s, and archaeologists could only approximate their locations based on old maps of dubious accuracy. An earlier investigation showed tentative evidence for a platform mound in the north campus location, and a more recent investigation corroborated and refined that information. Multiple lines of evidence were used to determine the location of the platform mound: examination of historical photographs, a reconstruction of the ancient surface grade, and a comparison of ancillary features from known platform mound contexts. The analysis of ancillary features beneath and adjacent to the inferred mound footprint provided new insights into the organization of public space in La Plaza and, more broadly, the mobilization of labor for communal construction projects in Hohokam society.

Upcoming Events:

Feb. 2, Noon-1 pm, PGM, Talk: Artificial Intelligence and the Classification of Ancient Southwestern Pottery by Chris Downum and Leszek Pawlowicz.

Feb. 3, 1-3 pm, PGM, Phoenix, Special Event: Mata Ortiz Pottery Presentation & Sale by author Dr. John V. Bezy on the prehistoric roots of the Mata Ortiz ceramic tradition and the archaeological area of Paquimé, in Casas Grandes, Chihuahua, Mexico. Master artist Oralia López will also demonstrate intricate process of painting these pots. Free and open to the public.

Feb. 7, 6:30 pm, PGMA, The Ancient Hohokam Ballgame of Arizona by Dr. Todd W. Bostwick.

Feb. 9, Noon-1 pm, PGM, Phoenix, Talk: Sherds and Social Boundaries in Central Arizona by Dr. Chris Watkins

Feb. 16, Noon-1 pm, PGM, Phoenix, Talk: Paddle and Anvil Pottery Production by Ron Carlos and Jacob Butler

Feb. 23, Noon-1 pm, PGM, Phoenix, Talk: The Origins of Pottery in Arizona by Dr. Chris Garraty, Assistant Director of Cultural Resources at Logan Simpson

Spring Meeting Schedule:

Mar. 13    Todd Bostwick, VVAC, 5,000 Years of Archaeology in Sicily: Crossroads of the Mediterranean

Apr. 10     Ethan Ortega, NPS Ranger, Coronado Historic Site, Bernalillo, NM. False Truths, Restored Ruins, and New Artifacts: Looking Beyond the Oxymoronic Past of Coronado Historic Site through Field Work

May 8       Dan Liponi, Kumeyaay/Patayan pictographs w/book signing. See ww.larumorosarockart.com.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

January 2018 Chapter News

January Meeting: Chris Garraty, Ph.D., Assistant Director of Cultural Resources, Logan Simpson, will present Relocating the Platform Mound at La Plaza: Recent Archaeological Investigations on ASU’s Tempe Campus. Recent archaeological and historical investigations at the Hohokam site of La Plaza revealed evidence that a Classic period platform mound once stood in the north part of ASU’s Tempe campus near Wells Fargo Arena. Maps from the late 1800s and early 1900s documented three Hohokam platform mounds within La Plaza. These mounds were leveled by the early to mid-1900s, and archaeologists can only approximate their locations based on old maps of dubious accuracy. An earlier investigation showed tentative evidence for a platform mound in the north campus location, and a more recent investigation corroborates and refines that finding. Multiple lines of evidence were used to determine the location of the platform mound: examination of historical photographs, a reconstruction of the ancient surface grade, and a comparison of ancillary features from known platform mound contexts. Analysis of ancillary features beneath and adjacent to the inferred mound footprint provides new insights into the organization of public space in La Plaza and, more broadly, the mobilization of labor for communal construction projects in Hohokam society.

Chris received his PhD in Anthropology from ASU in 2006 and his BA in Anthropology from Temple University in 1994 and is currently an adjunct faculty member at ASU. While at ASU he worked on the Teotihuacan Mapping Project with Dr. George Cowgill and on the Mixtequilla Archaeological Project in Veracruz with Dr. Barbara Stark. After receiving his PhD he worked as a Project Director at  Statistical Research in Tucson for several years and as a Project Manager for the Gila River Indian Community Cultural Resource Management Program for several more years before joining Logan Simpson. He has authored and co-authored numerous journal articles on his work in Arizona and Mexico, and co-edited with Dr. Stark the book Archaeological Approaches to Market Exchange in Ancient Societies published by the University Press of Colorado in May 2010.

December Meeting: Our Holiday Potluck featured ham, delicious shredded beef, tasty meatballs, and a variety of great side dishes and desserts. It was well attended and the meal was followed by an excellent presentation on Montezuma Castle: New Discoveries and Native American Traditional Knowledge at Montezuma Castle National Monument by Matt Guebard, an NPS Ranger stationed at Tuzigoot. Matt explained how he combined archaeological information with Native American oral histories to interpret the abandonment of Castle A and Montezuma Castle, two large pueblo sites located near Camp Verde. Archaeological data and traditional knowledge suggest that both sites were abandoned following a large and destructive fire at Castle A. Archaeological evidence suggests this event occurred in the late 14th century and included arson and physical violence, both of which were corroborated by Native American histories.

A drawing was held at the end of the night for a special door prize as well as the table decorations. Laurene Montero, our Chapter Advisor, conducted the election of officers for next year's board. Our board for 2018 is President/Programs - Ellie Large; Exec. VP/Cert. Rep. - Marie Britton; Treasurer - Bob Unferth; Secretary - Ellen Martin; 1 yr. Dir/Membership - Nancy Unferth; 2 yr. Dir./Girl Scouts - Vicki Erhart; 3 yr. Dir/Field Trips - Phyllis Smith. If anyone would like to join the board or to attend a board meeting, please call or email one of our current board members. Contact information is on the Phoenix Chapter page of the AAS website, azarchsoc.org/Phoenix.

December Hike: On Dec. 16th several members joined the Rim Country Chapter to hike to the Zulu petroglyph site near Rye as well as the Oxbow Ruin. The hike was led by J. J. Golio.

Obituaries: We found out recently via an Arizona Republic obituary that long-time member Don Ketchum passed away on Sept. 29, 2017, and that his wife, Jeanne, also a long-time member, had passed away on Nov. 15, 2014. They were very active members and always helped out at the Chili Booth and the Park of the Four Waters cleanup.

Upcoming Events:

Jan. 3, 6:30 pm, PGMA Talk: Ancient Southwestern Native American Pottery by Allen Dart.

Jan. 9, 5:30 pm, Archaeology Cafe, Archaeology under the Downtown Streets (and Runways). Dr. Michael Lindeman.

Feb. 2, Noon-1 pm, PGM Talk, Artificial Intelligence and the Classification of Ancient Southwestern Pottery by Chris Downum and Leszek Pawlowicz.

Feb. 3, 1 – 3 pm, PGM, Special Event: Mata Ortiz Pottery Presentation & Sale

Spring Meeting Schedule:

Feb. 13     Aaron Wright, ASW, The Western Range of the Red-on-Buff Culture, Redux

Mar. 13    Todd Bostwick, VVAC, 5,000 Years of Archaeology in Sicily: Crossroads of the Mediterranean

Apr. 10     Ethan Ortega, NPS Ranger, Coronado Historic Site, Bernalillo, NM. False Truths, Restored Ruins, and New Artifacts: Looking Beyond the Oxymoronic Past of Coronado Historic Site through Field Work

May 8       Dan Liponi, Kumeyaay/Patayan pictographs w/book signing. See www.larumorosarockart.com.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We will take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-827-8070 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

 

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